Chock-a-lock-a-love

Finding out that dark chocolate is actually a health food rocked my world. Yes, I said DARK chocolate – the darker the better. Milk chocolate? Nah. White chocolate? Oh, pul-eez. It isn’t even chocolate but basically milk, cocoa butter (has no cocoa) and sugar along with flavorings.

Amazingly, chocolate is an antioxidant which means it gets rid of free radicals which cause disease and aging. Heck, chocolate is even better for you than blueberries, green tea and pomegranates! All this goodness can lower your blood pressure, cholesterol, fight cancer, leap tall buildings in a single bound. You catch my meaning.

There is more but do you really need convincing beyond this?! Dark chocolate is satisfying in small amounts. It will take care of your sweet tooth with little damage to your waistline.

I’ll do what I have to to stave off aging and illness. Bring on the dark stuff.

What in the World Did I Do All Day?

As expected, I didn’t get a lot of comments on my last post. That is fine with me. I have to be at peace with God.

Lately, I’ve been wondering where time is going. I look around and see a house that needs vacuuming and dusting and straightening out in a big way and wonder why it hasn’t gotten done; why I can’t get it done.

As I sit here typing, I realize I could be doing the quiet parts of these tasks (Himself goes to sleep quite early because of his early shift) but here I sit watching tv and keeping up with my “social networks.”

Where did I go wrong? Let’s go over the events of today:

6:00 Woke up before Isabella’s arrival at around 6:20. Made tea and read my Bible.

6:20 Made Bells’ breakfast, prepared her snack for school and got her washed up and ready for school.

7:50 School bus arrived and I blew kisses to my little love. Instead of going back to bed, which I usually do for a few hours, I got ready for the day.

9:15 Started driving to my Weight Watchers meeting and returned the call I missed fifteen minutes earlier from my mother-in-law. Her defibrillator had gone off (for the second time in three weeks) and she needed to go to the doctor. My nephew drove her there and I skipped my meeting and took over at the doctor’s office (this has become my part time job).

11:30’ish At the hospital to have the pacemaker/defibrillator “interrogated” and found that the doctors feel an increase in medication will hopefully do the trick.

12:’ish Got Mom home and made sure she ate and drank a cup of tea. All she wanted to do was sleep so I left for….

12:45’ish …Weight Watchers weigh in…yea! All is good. 47 down and three to go.

1:00 Met a friend to pray for missionaries who are in creative access countries (countries where missionaries are not allowed)

2:00 Nap time for me.

4:40 Emerged from nap and spent time with Isabella and did absolutely nothing else of significance.

I could have gotten things done after my nap but the energy wasn’t there! Even thinking of doing anything makes me cringe inside.

Maybe some day, God willing, I will be blessed with energy. What I am thankful for is the ability to be do what I CAN do.

When I had to go on disability years ago, I never thought it would be for so long. The original reasons for this are still active and have intertwined with fibromyalgia. The times I am needed the most seem to fall on my “good” days and for this I am grateful.

What’s the saying, “Man plans and God laughs?” Ha! So true. I am so very blessed.

This blog post is part of

Why not visit some fellow bloggers?

Life Goes On

The last few weeks have flashed by in a whirlwind.

The Girl and Bells moved into a new place close by and we helped with that. Exhausting for all involved and we are hoping for the best.

Establishing Isabella in her new schedule at school has been difficult. Instead of being in the contained classroom all day, she has been entering school with the “neuro-typical” (N.T.) class (e.g. regular kindergarten class) and doing all her specials (library, phys. ed., music, etc.) with that class whilst doing her academics in the contained (autism) classroom. Her teacher from last year and the child study team leader felt she was ready for this. However, our nearly always happy girl has shown anxiety like never before.

Fortunately, her child study team leader saw her crying when she was leaving the gym one day and Bells was able to express that it was too noisy and too many kids and whatever else was bothering her. As a result, the team leader was able to ascertain which specials Bells felt comfortable. Things are going a bit better now. Maybe one more week will show a greater change. I want my happy girl back.<ins datetime=”2011-10-16T22:36:47+00:00″>

Yesterday, I gave Himself the day off and went to a wedding and reception with some friends. You know, I just might make a habit of this! We have gone to so many wedding receptions because of the number of children his friends have that it tends to get old. He is older than I am and some of MY friends’ children are of marrying age now. If he isn’t friends as a couple with my friends I will probably go the weddings by myself!

With all that has been going on, I am beat. When you don’t give in to the fatique of fibromyalgia, it will bite you in the bum. Today has been a true day of rest as in staying in bed until mid afternoon and doing no work at all. It’s a crazy balancing act but at least I am not experiencing a lot of pain. Yea! (That was last week when I didn’t give in! Flat on my back and sleeping for a day but that’s okay.)

All in all, life hasn’t been all that bad. Our bellies are full, we have clothing on our backs, a roof over our heads and a loving Father in heaven who meets all our needs.

Blessings to all, g

Ready for the Weekend

Oy, what a long week! Isabella spent two days home from school with a cold. Thankfully, it didn’t turn into anything worse like her mom had.

Saturday mornings are my time to sleep in and make up for the energy I expend during the week. Fibromyalgia doesn’t respect that have “places to go and people to see.” If I didn’t have Saturdays to recharge I would be layed out and unable to do what I have to do.

I am blessed that my fms is not totally debilitating. Some people sleep up to eighteen hours a day!

Next week is spring vacation and The Girl (my daughter who is a nanny) has most of the week off to spend with Bells. Yea! A week off for me!

It is supposed to be 80 degrees this Monday. Not good! Already the pollen count is high. Those who have been around a while know that hot weather, pollen and humidity are not my friends. Yuck.

I realize I am jabbering without a destination but, if I wait until I come up with something “deep” or amusing it might take a while.

Oh, Team Isabella walks again for the Walk for Autism Speaks. If you would like to donate, please email me and I will give you the information. We raise nearly $3000 last year!

Hope ya’ll have a great weekend, g

Light it Up Blue

April is Autism Awareness Month. April 2 is World Autism Awareness Day. On this date, homes and landmarks around the world will be lighting it up blue. My porch will have a blue light, the Empire State Building will shine blue, oh, so many places will shine the light on the need for people to understand the fastest growing healthcare crisis in America, maybe the world.

Please read this letter to President Obama and leave a comment so that he can see how important it would be to the nations, the world, to light up the White House blue: A Diary of a Mom Letter to the President- http://lightthewhitehouseblue.wordpress.com/2011/03/16/this-is-my-autism/#comments

Thank you so much, gail

Oh, no, not again

Something I might not have shared with you in the past is that, in the past, I have suffered from crippling panic attacks. It has been a while since I feared them but, this past week, that has changed.

Out of the blue, this past Tuesday I had a full blown attack. It popped up, seemingly, out of nowhere. I was so thankful that Isabella wasn’t with me as I have no idea how she might have reacted to her Booboo freaking out.

What does one of these attacks look like for me? The pressure in my chest makes me fear a heart attack. Sometimes some pain in my left arm almost convinces me. I tend to feel very hot. I believe I said out loud, “Oh, dear God, help me!” I left my seat in the living room and walked to the kitchen where I held on to the counter for dear life and remembered my training from the Claire Weekes book Hope and Help for Your Nerves .

Self talk:

You are having a panic attack
You have survived them before.
Accept that you are having this panic attack
Your heart is a very strong muscle and it will not explode.
Breathe and float through it.

Sounds too simple, right? Well, it took years for me to be able to work through this. Still, it is a horrible experience.

Why am I talking about this? Why do I talk about most things? To get the word out that we are not alone with our ills and heartaches. I could write about only rosey, wonderful things happening in my life and you could say, “Oh, what a lovely life she has!” Well, I do have a pretty good life but it is not all flowers and butterflys! It has ugliness in it. However, I always have hope.

Hope. How glorious is hope?! I know that this earthly shell is temporary and that I have a heavenly home being prepared for me. When I get there, I will not have panic attacks or fibromyalgia or weight issues. My Isabella will join me there and her autism will be left behind. My grammy, whose Parkinson’s stole her expressive face, will greet me with her smile. Oh, what a wonderful hope!

Life has been tough lately. My mother-in-law is in poor health and I am the only one not working full-time so I need to be available to her for doctors’ appointments. The Girl needs Himself and me to care for Isabella when she is not in school. Two things that have probably brought back the panic attacks.

Things will get better.

Blessings, g

Women, Take Heed

 
In these waning days of September, the month dedicated to ovarian cancer awareness, I would be remiss not to list the signs and symptoms of this silent killer:
 

Symptoms of Ovarian Cancer

Even in its early stages ovarian cancer has symptoms. Research indicates that 95 percent of women with ovarian cancer had symptoms and 90 percent of women experienced symptoms with early-stage ovarian cancer. Symptoms vary from woman to woman and many times depend on the location of the tumor and its impact on the surrounding organs. Many of the symptoms mimic other conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome.

The Gynecologic Cancer Foundation, the Society of Gynecologic Oncologists and the American Cancer Society, with significant support from the Alliance formed a consensus statement on ovarian cancer. The Ovarian Cancer National Alliance has endorsed the consensus statement, which was announced in June 2007. The statement follows.

Historically ovarian cancer was called the “silent killer” because symptoms were not thought to develop until the chance of cure was poor. However, recent studies have shown this term is untrue and that the following symptoms are much more likely to occur in women with ovarian cancer than women in the general population. These symptoms include:

  • Bloating
  • Pelvic or abdominal pain
  • Difficulty eating or feeling full quickly
  • Urinary symptoms (urgency or frequency)

Women with ovarian cancer report that symptoms are persistent and represent a change from normal for their bodies. The frequency and/or number of such symptoms are key factors in the diagnosis of ovarian cancer. Several studies show that even early stage ovarian cancer can produce these symptoms.

Women who have these symptoms almost daily for more than a few weeks should see their doctor, preferably a gynecologist. Prompt medical evaluation may lead to detection at the earliest possible stage of the disease. Early stage diagnosis is associated with an improved prognosis.

Please visit OCNA for more information.